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ATPL » Air Law – Aeroplane » Separation

36.63 Separation

36.63.2 Describe the situations where Air Traffic Control is responsible for the provision of separation between VFR, SVFR and IFR traffic. AIP ENR

ENR 1.1 GENERAL RULES AND PROCEDURES

9 ATC SEPARATION 

9.1 Separation Provided

9.1.1 Separation is provided by ATC:

  • (a) between IFR flights in Classes A, C, and D airspace; except that separation is not provided during hours of daylight in Class D airspace when flights have been cleared to climb or descend subject to maintaining own separation in VMC;
  • (b) between IFR and VFR flights in class C airspace;
  • (c) between IFR and SVFR flights;
  • (d) between SVFR flights when the flight visibility is reported to be less than 5km; and
  • (e) at controlled aerodromes when defined runway and wake turbulence separations are applicable.

 

36.63.4 Describe the situations where the pilot-in-command of an IFR flight is responsible for maintaining separation from other traffic. AIP ENR

ENR 1.1 GENERAL RULES AND PROCEDURES

9 ATC SEPARATION 

9.2 Separation Not Provided 

9.2.1 Separation is not provided:

  • (a) between IFR flights in Class G airspace;
  • (b) between IFR and VFR flights in Class G airspace; between IFR and VFR flights in Class D airspace; between an IFR flight at the lowest usable cruising level in Class C airspace and a VFR flight in Class D airspace operating at the common airspace level;
  • (c) between SVFR flights when the flight visibility is reported to be 5km or greater;
  • (d) between VFR flights, except at controlled aerodromes when defined runway and wake turbulence separations are applicable. (Within the circuit at controlled aerodromes, an aerodrome control service is provided in which instructions, clearances and information are issued to VFR flights to prevent collisions and to achieve defined runway and wake turbulence separation.)
  • (e) between a flight known to be responding to a TCAS RA, or a GPWS or TAWS alert, and other flights where separation is normally provided as listed above. When the pilot advises “Clear of conflict”, ATC will make every endeavour to restore standard separation and an orderly flow of traffic. ATC responsibility for maintaining separation resumes from the time that separation is re-established between all aircraft involved in the manoeuvre.
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