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2.14 Distress and Urgency Communications

2.14.2 Describe the degrees of emergency that warrant:

(a) a distress call (MAYDAY); 

A condition of being threatened by serious and/or imminent danger and of requiring immediate assistance. 

e.g. Engine Failure, Engine fire 

 

(b) an urgency call (PAN PAN).

A condition concerning the safety of an aircraft or other vehicle, or of some person on board or within sight, but which does not require immediate assistance. 

e.g. Heart attack passenger 

 

2.14.4 Explain the procedures and phraseology involved in transmitting a MAYDAY and PAN call with emphasis on: 

(a) radio frequencies; 

  • The pilot of an aircraft in distress must transmit on the air-ground frequency in use at the time of the distress the distress signal MAYDAY (preferably spoken three times), followed by the distress message.
  • The pilot of an aircraft reporting an urgency condition must transmit on the air-ground frequency in use at the time the urgency signal PAN PAN (preferably spoken three times), followed by the urgency message.
  • If on an unattended frequency and it is considered that better assistance can be provided by transferring to another frequency the pilot should do so, after broadcasting this intention on the original frequency
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